Parkinson Type Design joins Typekit

March 8, 2012

Rock and roll! The legendary Jim Parkinson, designer of iconic logotypes and display faces, has partnered with Typekit to bring his unique and powerful fonts to the web. Available today are Cabazon, Hotel (Solid and Open), and the Modesto family, including Condensed, Expanded, and Text (named for its lowercase letters, but still a display face — use it large).

The painterly style of these Parkinson types reminded me of this post I wrote last summer after attending a workshop led by John Downer, and I couldn’t resist putting together a few more examples (demo) of tasteful text-shadow application inspired by Jim’s photography and lettering.


Cabazon with an offset drop shadow

h1.cabazon {
  font-family: "cabazon", serif;
  font-weight: 400;
  background-color: #fcfae6;
  color: #c71b00;
  text-shadow:
    1px 1px 0 #fcfae6,
    1px -1px 0 #fcfae6,
    5px 3px 0 #000;
  }


Hotel Open (in green) atop Hotel Solid, with a subtle glow

h1.hotel {
  font-family: "hotel-solid", sans-serif;
  font-weight: 400;
  color: #086190;
  background-color: #02202f;
  text-shadow: 0 0 30px rgba(255,255,255,.25);
  }
h1.hotel span { position: relative; }
h1.hotel span:after {
  position: absolute; left: 0;
  content: attr(title); /* title = "pause" */
  font-family: "hotel-open", sans-serif;
  font-weight: 400;
  color: #bcf084;
  }


Modesto Expanded, with a subtle outline and two-tone printer’s shade

h1.modesto {
  font-family: "modesto-expanded", serif;
  font-weight: 400;
  color: #e4d457;
  background-color: #a33e19;
  letter-spacing: 0.5rem;
  text-shadow:
    1px -1px #4e1c11,
    -1px -1px #4e1c11,
    1px 1px #4e1c11,
    -1px 1px #4e1c11,
    0 1px #4e1c11,
    1px 0 #4e1c11,
    1px 2px #6d2718,
    2px 1px #e76a4f,
    2px 3px #6d2718,
    3px 2px #e76a4f,
    3px 4px #6d2718,
    4px 3px #e76a4f,
    4px 5px #6d2718,
    5px 4px #e76a4f,
    5px 6px #6d2718,
    6px 5px #e76a4f,
    6px 7px #6d2718,
    7px 6px #e76a4f,
    7px 8px #6d2718,
    8px 7px #e76a4f,
    8px 9px #6d2718,
    9px 8px #e76a4f,
    9px 10px #6d2718,
    10px 9px #e76a4f,
    10px 11px #6d2718,
    11px 10px #e76a4f,
    11px 12px #6d2718,
    12px 11px #e76a4f,
    12px 13px #6d2718,
    13px 12px #e76a4f,
    13px 14px #6d2718,
    14px 13px #e76a4f;
  }

Parkinson Type Design fonts are available to all Typekit users. Use them for your next big headline, and please join us in welcoming Jim to Typekit.

3 Responses to “Parkinson Type Design joins Typekit”

  1. Alan Bennington Says:

    All wonderful…especially like Apex!!

  2. Eric Carl Says:

    Completely off topic, but out of curiosity, what kind of role does font hinting play on a high-res display like the new iPad 3? My understanding is that hinting is required to keep fonts rendering clearly on the low resolution of traditional displays, but does something like the retina display, especially as those high resolutions become more wide spread in the future, negate the need for such a laborious and time consuming process?

    • Tim Brown Says:

      TrueType hinting has no place in high-resolution environments like the iPhone/iPad retina display, and in fact, it has no place in many low-resolution environments. We currently only serve TrueType files to Windows, and even then only for text faces. Display faces, like these from Jim Parkinson, are best served with PostScript-based outlines for smooth rendering at large sizes.

      As high-resolution experiences become more common, anti-aliasing-related rendering issues will disappear. However, the clarity brought on by Apple’s retina displays will reveal (and is already revealing) the awkwardness of poorly drawn and spaced fonts. Plus, we’ll continue to have to deal with CSS-related rendering issues.

      Good question, Eric.


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