Typekit’s plans are structured, in part, around an allotment of monthly pageviews, which are counted in aggregate across all of the kits in your account. Until now, the system we’ve used to track pageviews on users’ sites has not accounted for browser caching. This means that we have undercounted the number of pageviews on all users’ sites. We are now making a shift to incorporate pageviews into the way we pay our foundry partners. As a result, starting today, we’re moving to a system which will help ensure more accurate pageview measurement, whether a kit remains cached or not.

This new system uses a one pixel transparent image to record every pageview; the image is loaded asynchronously and will not block page loading. This is a common pattern used by many web services, and one which we have already put to use on our CDN-integrated Enterprise plans. We are confident you won’t see any meaningful difference in the appearance or loading of your sites as a result of this change.

You may, however, notice the pageview chart on your account increase over the next few weeks. If you were close to your plan’s pageview limit before, you may find that this update puts you over that limit. That said, we will not automatically shut off any account that goes over the limit solely as a result of this change; rather, any Typekit user with an account created today or earlier will be given a three-month grace period on their pageview limits. If this update puts you over the limit of your current plan, that means you have time before you will be asked to upgrade to a higher plan.

The data that we collect from this pageview measurement will be used in two ways: to monitor whether accounts are within their plan limits and, most importantly, to compensate our foundry partners for the use of their fonts on users’ sites. Our goal has always been to provide an excellent service while also supporting the hard work that foundries and type designers do to bring their type to the web; more accurate measurement allows us to do all of these things better.

As always, if you have any questions about this, reach out to support@typekit.com and we will get back to you right away.

This week saw the announcement for Adobe’s much-anticipated Creative Cloud service, a new subscription service where you can create, publish, and share your work using Adobe Creative Suite applications, Adobe Touch Apps, and services. We’re excited to announce that a Typekit plan will be included with every Creative Cloud subscription.

What does this mean for you? If you choose to subscribe to Creative Cloud, you’ll receive a Typekit Portfolio plan along with your subscription. You will get all the applications that come with Creative Suite and a Typekit account with access to our full library — all for just $49.99 a month. (And if you’ve previously purchased Creative Suite 3 or later, your first year of Creative Cloud will cost just $29.99 a month.)

If you are a current Typekit user on the Personal, Portfolio, or Performance plans, you will be able to upgrade to a Creative Cloud subscription. When you do so, you’ll receive a prorated refund for the time remaining on your current Typekit plan. But this upgrade is optional: if you prefer, you can stick with your current Typekit plan just as it is. All of Typekit’s plans will continue to be available standalone through typekit.com.

In order to take advantage of Creative Cloud, you must first update your Typekit account to use Adobe ID. Your Adobe ID will allow us to link your Creative Cloud subscription to your Typekit account. If you have not yet updated your account, read on to learn how.

In the meantime, if you have any questions, feel free to ask them here or reach out to support@typekit.com.

Beginning today, you can update your Typekit account to use an Adobe ID. If you already have an Adobe ID, this means one less login to remember; you can sign in to typekit.com with the same username and password you use to sign in to other Adobe products. If you don’t yet have an Adobe ID, creating one takes only a few seconds, and doing so will pave the way for you to take advantage of Adobe’s Creative Cloud service launching this spring.

If you’re an existing Typekit user, you can update your account now. Note that doing so is not required; you may continue to use your current login if you prefer. If you haven’t yet signed up for Typekit, you’ll be prompted to sign in with an Adobe ID (or create a new Adobe ID) when you create your account.

As part of the new Adobe ID support, we have updated the Typekit terms of use and are moving to the standard Adobe privacy policy. These changes bring us in line with Adobe’s practices and pave the way for new features down the road.

Read more about how to update your account. Or, if you have questions, drop a line to support@typekit.com and we’ll get back to you right away.

As our library gets bigger and better, finding just the right font becomes more challenging. When we updated our font browsing last fall, we focused on helping you quickly narrow down the list of fonts to just the ones that would work. Now, we’re rolling out the next stage in an ongoing effort to make it easier to find what you need: new and improved search.

Our first search system focused on finding fonts, and only finding fonts. But as Typekit has evolved, we’ve also added more content: from blog posts, to help documentation, to the recently released browse by lists, and more to come. So it was time for our search tool to branch out: the new search now turns up results for everything, not just fonts.

New search, now with more content

The new search shows results for everything — fonts, lists, blog posts, and help docs — all at once.

That means you’re just as able to discover a blog post about Urbana as you are to find Urbana itself. We still return font results first, and you can filter to see only fonts if you like. And we still include font names in the search auto-complete, so if you know exactly which font you want, you can get to it fast. But if you want to see all of the results for a term, now you can.

Search everything, or filter to see results from only one section.

As we add more kinds of content, the search results will evolve, so that they become more and more useful over time. Additionally, we’ll be analyzing our search logs, and tweaking the results based on actual usage over time. So, the more you use it, the better it will get. Start now!

Starting today, we’ve added support for Typekit fonts on the new Chrome for Android. This new browser adds support for the WOFF file format — the industry standard and our preferred format wherever it’s supported. To get this latest update, just republish your kits.

Additionally, we’ve updated our support for the default Android browser. Typekit has supported fonts on this browser since Android 2.2 added support for OpenType fonts in the fall of 2010. But beginning with Android 3.1, that font support changed: with that version, Android dropped support for the name table obfuscation that Typekit uses to make sure our commercial fonts are not installable when served on the web.

As much as we work hard to make sure Typekit’s fonts work everywhere, we also have an obligation to our foundry partners to ensure reasonable protections for their fonts. As such, in order to continue serving fonts to the default Android browser on Android 3.1+, we are revising our support to use SVG fonts instead of OpenType fonts. SVG fonts are not installable in the first place, so they do not need the same level of protection as OpenType fonts. Unfortunately, SVG fonts also have some drawbacks: they can have larger file sizes, and they do not support advanced OpenType features. But even with these drawbacks, we believe SVG fonts are the best option for supporting the default browser on Android 3.1+; Android devices running 2.2–3.0 will continue to receive OpenType fonts.

In time, we hope that the new Chrome Browser for Android will replace the default, making for a better browsing experience and increasing the number of commonly used browsers that support the WOFF standard.

As before, you can enable or disable sending fonts to Android or other mobile devices in your Kit Editor (under Kit Settings > Mobile Settings). If you are supporting Android, you need only republish your kits to get the latest updates.

Adobe Creative Cloud

This spring will see the release of Adobe’s much-anticipated Creative Cloud service, a new subscription service where you can create, publish, and share your work using Adobe Creative Suite applications, Adobe Touch Apps, and services. We’re excited to announce that a Typekit plan will be included with every Creative Cloud subscription.

What does this mean for you? If you choose to subscribe to Creative Cloud, you’ll receive a Typekit Portfolio plan along with your subscription. You will get all the applications that come with Creative Suite and a Typekit account with access to our full library — all for just $49.99 a month.

If you are an existing Typekit user on the Personal, Portfolio, or Performance plan, you will be able to upgrade to a Creative Cloud subscription. When you do so, you’ll receive a prorated refund for the time remaining on your current Typekit plan. But this upgrade is entirely optional: if you prefer, you can stick with your current Typekit plan just as it is. All of Typekit’s plans will continue to be available as standalone accounts.

As we get closer to the Creative Cloud release, we’ll provide more detail about how you can upgrade. In the meantime, if you have any questions, feel free to ask them here or write support@typekit.com.