Another week, another TypeTogether font upgrade. LFT Etica has been updated for better screen rendering and cross-platform consistency: its Regular, Italic, Bold, and Bold Italic styles have been manually TrueType hinted for sharp rendering at small sizes on Windows.

LFT Etica Regular, hinted, in Windows GDI w/ ClearTypeLFT Etica Regular, unhinted, in Windows GDI w/ ClearType

On top of that, LFT Etica’s vertical metrics have been improved for consistency across browsers and operating systems. Because vertical metrics updates may cause slight positioning changes in some designs, we don’t roll out these kinds of changes automatically. Instead, just republish your kits to receive the new files.

Upgrade to a Personal plan or higher to use LFT Etica. If you’re already a Typekit customer, enjoy the improved fonts! If you’ve never tried Typekit, sign up (it’s free). You can upgrade at any time.

Three of our most popular fonts – Adelle Sans, Adelle, and Calluna – have been updated for better screen rendering and cross-platform consistency: Adelle Light and Semibold (plus their italics); Adelle Sans Regular and Bold (plus their italics); and Calluna Regular and Bold (plus their italics). Each of these fonts has now been manually TrueType hinted for crisp rendering at text sizes.

Adelle Regular, hinted, in Windows GDI w/ ClearTypeAdelle Sans Regular, unhinted, in Windows GDI w/ ClearType

Adelle Semibold Italic, hinted, in Windows GDI w/ ClearTypeAdelle Semibold Italic, unhinted, in Windows GDI w/ ClearType

Calluna Regular, hinted, in Windows GDI w/ ClearTypeCalluna Regular, unhinted, in Windows GDI w/ ClearType

In addition, the vertical metrics of each font in these families have been revised for cross-platform consistency. Because vertical metrics updates may cause slight positioning changes in some designs, we don’t roll out these kinds of changes automatically. Instead, just republish your kits to receive the new files.

If you’re already a Typekit customer, enjoy the improved fonts! Or, if you’ve never given Typekit a try, sign up (it’s free) and upgrade as you need to.


From Just Another Foundry comes JAF Bernini Sans, a brand new type family that has already garnered rave reviews. We’re pleased to announce that all fifty styles are now available in the Typekit library: five weights ranging from Light to Extra Bold; four widths including Narrow, Condensed, and Compressed; plus two versions of every variation (hard-lined Bernino and the softer Bernina).



Top to bottom: Bernina Compressed, Condensed, Narrow, Normal; left to right: Light, Regular, Semibold, Bold Extra Bold. Hover for Bernino.

Bernini Sans’ versatility stems from its many weights, widths, and alternate characters, as well as its unpretentious and straightforward design. Most of the shapes and spaces in these fonts do their jobs quietly and efficiently; and in cases where a different style of character is called for, a little hop from Bernino to Bernina (or vice versa) makes a big difference.


Left to right: Bernino Sans Condensed with Bernino, Bernina Sans Compressed with Adelle, and JAF Peacock with Bernina. See the full examples on our demo page.

Used for both text and headings, Bernini Sans feels efficient and precise, but also comfortable; paired with Adelle, it produces a squared, rhythmic energy. And, it can give a more expressive titling face like JAF Peacock a sturdy foundation. Bernini Sans makes pairing typefaces easy.


Left to right: 12, 11, and 10 pixel Bernino Regular on Windows (GDI/ClearType)

The normal width styles of Bernino and Bernina render exceptionally well across browsers and operating systems, thanks to extensive manual TrueType hinting by designer Tim Ahrens. In his words:

One nice thing about Bernini is that you can use it for body text but also for headlines. It is definitely a font you have to work with — and one you can work with — as opposed to “dipping” your website in it. A bit in the vein of what Jason [Santa Maria] says: “Don’t use readymades.”

Upgrade to a Personal plan or higher to use JAF Bernini Sans. If you’re already a paying Typekit customer, enjoy the new fonts! If you’ve never given Typekit a try, sign up (it’s free!) and upgrade to a paid plan whenever you’re ready.

Today, we’re delighted to announce that FontFont is offering many more typefaces in the Typekit subscription library — including FF Ernestine, FF Spinoza, FF More, FF Amman, FF Utility, FF Kava, and additional styles of popular fonts like FF Meta and FF Dax. Overall, we have added 22 new and updated FontFonts (totaling 121 new variations) to the library. Quite a few, but this is just a portion of the FontFont catalog — a diverse and carefully curated selection of web-ready typefaces capable of serving many needs.

See a few of the new library FontFonts in action on our demo page.

The new families, in alphabetical order, are FF Amman Sans and Serif; FF Angie; FF Avance; FF Chambers Sans; FF Ernestine; FF Ginger; FF Karbid, Text, and Slab; FF Kava; FF More (also in Wide and Condensed); FF Spinoza; FF Utility; and FF Zwo Correspondence. In addition, FF Dax Condensed now has Italic, Bold, and Bold Italic styles; FF Meta Condensed now has Book Italic, Normal, Normal Italic, Bold, and Bold Italic styles; FF Prater Sans and Serif now have Bold styles; and FF Speak now has Italic, Heavy, and Heavy Italic styles.

See a web font specimen of any Typekit font by choosing “Open expanded Web Font Specimen” on its font detail page. Above: FF Spinoza, FF Ernestine, and FF Amman Serif specimens.

One way to get to know these FontFonts better is by studying their web font specimens. For instance, typefaces are sized and positioned differently within their em boxes. Designers should be aware of these subtle size and spacing differences so that we can compensate accordingly when we set CSS font-size.


Left to right: FF Spinoza, FF Ernestine, FF Amman Serif

Even when size and position are relatively consistent, as with these three FontFonts, character width and built-in spacing have a big effect on how big the type looks. FF Spinoza has nearly the same cap-height and x-height as FF Ernestine and FF Amman Serif, yet it sets much smaller.

Another way to get to know the FontFont catalog is to look for your favorites at FontFont.com, where you can read about their individual histories and the type designers who drew them. FontShop also offers some fantastic educational resources.

Upgrade to a Portfolio plan or higher to use all of the new-to-library FontFonts. If you’ve never given Typekit a try, sign up (it’s free!) and upgrade to a paid plan whenever you’re ready. And of course, even more of FontFont’s catalog is available directly from FontFont — license these, and you can host them on Typekit with the push of a button.

Leander Script Pro and Source Sans Pro

Today we welcome two newly-released fonts from Adobe Type into the Typekit library: Viktor Solt-Bittner’s Leander Script Pro (Regular and Bold) and Paul Hunt’s Source Sans Pro (Extra Light, Light, Regular, Semibold, Bold, and Black, plus italics). Source Sans Pro is Adobe’s first open source font release; Hunt shares why Adobe created an open source typeface over on Typblography.

We’ve also added five fonts from the Adobe Wood Type series to the library: Cottonwood Std, Ironwood Std, Juniper Std, Mesquite Std, and Ponderosa Std. These decorative typefaces look great set in bright colors, and fit right in with Typekit’s other Wild West fonts.

Source Sans Pro is available in all Typekit plans. Upgrade to a Personal plan or higher to use Leander Script Pro and the Wood Type series.

Adobe’s Typblography blog has more details on the new additions. Enjoy!

FF Tisa Sans

We’re excited to announce that FF Tisa Sans is now available in the Typekit subscription library. Its sibling serif, FF Tisa, is one of your favorite fonts, and we think FF Tisa Sans will be too.


Superfamilies like Tisa (sans and serif) work well together, naturally.

FF Tisa Sans’ strengths are evident in its structure, rhythm, and finishing touches: letterforms are open, friendly, and well spaced for running text, with endearing stroke twists and proportions that provide personality without being distracting.


Compare Tisa Sans Regular (above) to Helvetica (below).

Even in small doses, FF Tisa Sans can set a charismatic tone for entire compositions. Its energy and warmth enliven grid-based layouts that might otherwise feel cold and sterile.


Our demo page.


Shapes in our illustration, lettering (“ca”), and type (“se”) complement one another.

A typeface with both utility and flair, FF Tisa Sans offers lots of opportunity for formal resonance. It can be the inspiration for graphic elements like buttons and borders, or it can help similar, more exaggerated shapes in lettering and illustration feel like they belong together (as it does in our demo page).

Upgrade to a Personal plan or higher to use FF Tisa Sans. If you’re already a paying Typekit customer, enjoy the new fonts! If you’ve never given Typekit a try, sign up (it’s free!) and upgrade to a paid plan whenever you’re ready.

Notes: The “Wildcard” heading in our demo page is an image with alt text, set in Quicksilver from Photo-Lettering. Special thanks to Chris Silverman for the illustrations and quote. You can see more of Chris’ work on Dribbble and on his site.

One of the most popular fonts on Typekit, Adelle from TypeTogether, has been updated for better screen rendering and cross-platform consistency. Adelle Regular, Italic, Bold, and Bold Italic have been manually TrueType-hinted for crisp rendering at text sizes, and we serve the remaining weights and styles with PostScript-based outlines for smooth rendering at display sizes.

Adelle Regular, hinted, in Windows GDI w/ ClearTypeAdelle Regular, unhinted, in Windows GDI w/ ClearType

In addition, Adelle’s vertical metrics have been revised for cross-platform consistency, and to ensure that no glyphs are clipped. Because vertical metrics updates may cause slight positioning changes in some designs, we don’t roll out the changes automatically. Instead, just republish your kits to receive the new files.

Please join us in celebrating TypeTogether’s commitment to making great typefaces available quickly, and improving them as we all learn more about fonts on the web.

This week we’re happy to announce three new releases from TypeTogether: Adelle Sans, Tablet Gothic (plus Wide, Narrow, Semi Condensed, Condensed, and Compressed widths), and Soleil.


Adelle Sans is the lovely new counterpart to Adelle, one of Typekit’s most popular web fonts. While Adelle Sans easily stands on its own, it also pairs perfectly with its slab sibling. Available in seven weights, each with an accompanying italic.


Tablet Gothic is a headline superfamily. Equipped with seven weights in six widths for a total of 42 fonts, you’ll have everything you need to create designs that are both flexible and consistent.


TypeTogether also found time to release Wolfgang Homola’s Soleil. Like many popular geometric sans serifs, Soleil has open counters and friendly proportions that give it a soft exterior and counterbalance its rigid skeleton.

Soleil is available in all Typekit plans. Upgrade to a Personal plan or higher to use Adelle Sans and Tablet Gothic. If you’ve never given Typekit a try, sign up (it’s free!) and upgrade to a paid plan whenever you’re ready.

Roll up your sleeves! Let’s get to work with new styles of Quatro Slab from psType. Its hefty Ultra Black has been available on Typekit for a while, but the family now includes nine additional styles ranging from Regular to Ultra Black Italic. In a word, and in our demo page, Quatro Slab is strong.

h1 {
  font-family: "quatro-slab", serif;
  font-weight: 900;
  text-transform: uppercase;
  letter-spacing: 0.01em;
  }

Quatro Slab’s massive Ultra Black is a powerful force, especially in all caps. A little letter spacing goes a long way here, and helps the big forms breathe.


Runda paragraph text, with Quatro Slab Bold above and below.

Runda, also from psType, is a no-nonsense sans that works well with Quatro Slab. While their underlying stylistic rationale differs, these two faces have many structural similarities (compare their specimens), share similar proportions (their cap and x-heights, for example), and both convey a feeling of measured practicality.


Blue and green dots identifying white spaces that resonate with one another’s volume.

Just as strokes and slabs in typefaces can inspire formal aspects of a composition, counters and crevices can inspire line-height, margins, and other white space. Quatro Slab’s weighty angles and sculpted nooks offer many opportunities for finding balance.

Upgrade to a Personal plan or higher to use Quatro Slab. If you’re already a paying Typekit customer, enjoy the new styles! If you’ve never given Typekit a try, sign up (it’s free!) and upgrade to a paid plan whenever you’re ready.

New FontFonts are now available to host on Typekit, including FF Eureka Sans, FF Legato, FF Max, FF Meta Headline, FF Scuba, FF Seria Sans, FF Strada, FF Tisa Sans, and more. See the latest FontFont newsletter for details.


FF Tisa Sans Black and Bold, with FF Tisa Regular (source text)

FF Tisa Sans boasts a meaty fourteen styles, from Thin to Black. Tisa Sans is a new counterpart to one of FontFont’s most popular web fonts, and a customer favorite here at Typekit: FF Tisa.


FF Legato Demibold, Italic, and Bold

Agile and active, FF Legato was designed to exercise the black-white relationships in typeset words. Legato feels like a face made for reading. Used for headlines, the tension between its letterforms and their white space seems impossibly high — as though nothing could disrupt its balance.


FF Eureka Sans Bold Italic and Regular (source text)

Even at its most bold, the tall and lean FF Eureka Sans sets a light, elegant tone. Its boughs and bends appear poised to flex gracefully at a moment’s notice, yet the face conveys strength. Available in two widths of five weights each, with italics.

License any of these fonts from FontFont, and host them on Typekit with any of our plans (including our free plan). When you purchase a one-time web license for type families or individual typefaces at FontFont, you’ll receive a link to activate your fonts on Typekit. Then, you can use them just as you would fonts from our subscription library. You can even mix Web FontFonts in the same kits as Typekit library fonts. It’s easy, and all of your fonts stay organized on Typekit in a special “Purchased Fonts” tab. Here’s how it works.


The Purchased Fonts tab organizes fonts you’ve licensed outside of Typekit

Typekit’s subscription library is a solid foundation. But, in Robert Bringhurst’s words, as you “choose your library of faces slowly and well,” remember to think outside the library, too. By bringing fonts to Typekit, as well as finding go-to typefaces we already offer, you can cultivate your own personal type library.