This is our sixth post in a series highlighting foundry partners who will offer fonts for desktop sync, including Dalton Maag, FontFont, Mark Simonson Studio, TypeTogether, and ParaType.

Jos Buivenga has been designing type for nearly twenty years, beginning in 1994 with a font named Delicious. Pleased with the favorable response to his first designs, Jos posted the fonts on his website for free downloading, and continued with his typography hobby on the side of other work. After about a decade of this, and in response to his growing popularity, he opened the exljbris foundry and transitioned into full-time type design.

Throughout his years of designing type, Jos has continued to make many of his completed fonts available for free download online—a relaxed business model for a foundry, to be sure, and one which has won him a great deal of interest and popularity. The price point isn’t the only reason we see his type in so many places, though; Jos keeps the quality high as well, and works to continually expand and improve upon the font families his foundry offers. We’ve especially enjoyed the immensely popular Museo superfamily, and after seeing some fantastic use of this and other exljbris fonts on the web, we’re excited to begin offering them for desktop sync later this month.

Calluna sample in Word
Calluna, shown as a font option in Microsoft Word.

One of the first “serious” versions of a text font from exljbris, Calluna is an attractive option for longer blocks of text that need to be easy to read even at small sizes. Subtle details—like the long descenders on capitals Q and J—give Calluna a distinct personality without becoming distracting. It looks great on screen, and translates nicely to desktop word processing programs as a refreshing alternative to your system default serifs.

Anivers sample in Keynote
Anivers in Keynote.

Designed as tribute font for Smashing Magazine’s first anniversary, the distinctive shape of Anivers immediately grabs readers’ attention. Since its release in 2007, Jos has worked to expand it into a robust and reliable font family that is suitable for several different uses; while it really shines as a display font, it also makes for an attractive and very readable text font at smaller sizes. We’ve sampled it here in Keynote; in presentations, this is a typeface that the back row should have no trouble deciphering, and it’s stylish to boot.

Below is a complete list of the families from exljbris that we’ll be making available for desktop sync. Add them to your favorites so you can find them quickly when we launch the desktop sync feature, and use them on the web today. If you’ve never given Typekit a try, sign up (it’s free!), and upgrade to a paid plan when you’re ready.

Please join us in welcoming the storied Berthold Types to Typekit! Similar to our partnerships with FontFont, Process Type Foundry, and ARS Type, you can now purchase web licensing for your favorite Berthold fonts and use them on Typekit alongside your library subscription.

akzidenz

Without a doubt, Akzidenz-Grotesk is Berthold’s most well known typeface. First published in 1898, it has inspired other typeface designs for more than a century — Helvetica itself was designed as a reaction to Akzidenz. And now, in 2013, we’re happy to report that Akzidenz-Grotesk is available for web use at a level of quality that properly reflects its 115 years of popularity and usefulness.

License Akzidenz-Grotesk and many other typefaces – like AG Book, Akzidenz-Grotesk Next, City, Corporate ASE, Formata, Futura BQ, Imago, and more – directly from Berthold Types, and host them on Typekit with any of our plans (including our free plan).

Here’s how it works. Simply purchase a web license from Berthold Types, then follow the instructions to receive a voucher link to Typekit. Your new fonts will be instantly transferred to your Typekit account, can be added to a kit just like any other Typekit font, and will be linked through the simple line of code you’ve already added to your site.

Fonts licensed elsewhere and hosted on Typekit will automatically work in every browser that supports @font-face, including those that don’t support WOFF or EOT. Plus, you can look forward to seamless upgrades in the future, whenever your fonts are updated and as web browsers evolve.

This is our fifth post in a series highlighting foundry partners who will offer fonts for desktop sync, including Dalton Maag, FontFont, Mark Simonson Studio and TypeTogether.

ParaType

Established in 1989, ParaType specializes in developing fonts for high-quality display on screen, with a particular skill for working across different alphabets. In 1995, ParaType introduced Futura PT, which was re-formatted to support multiple languages, including a set of Cyrillic characters. Superior hinting makes Futura PT a reliable font that can handle a wide range of screen resolutions.

 

cyrillic

Cyrillic character set shown in Adobe InDesign’s Glyph panel.

ParaType’s release is just one of the most recent milestones in the long timeline of Futura’s history. Originally introduced in 1931, Futura was first designed for Bauer Type Foundry by Paul Renner. In a specimen book titled Futura: The Type of Today and Tomorrow, Renner elaborates on his design ideas.

FUTURA PT

Renner was deeply influenced by the Bauhaus School, and this is reflected in his thinking about Futura. He strove to design a typeface that was timeless, based on form and function, with a look that was more mechanical than calligraphic. Renner explains:

“Futura attempts, for the first time, to present the form of characters in the most abstract manner conceivable… Through the looking glass the letters of Futura are never of quite equal weight… These variations, derived from the recognition of optical illusion, bring about an equal distribution of color.”

Futura PT Speciman: Heavy, Book, Book Oblique, Heavy Oblique

Futura is built from geometric shapes—rectangles, circles, and triangles. Here, Renner used symmetry and proportion to his advantage: the ascenders on the lowercase letters are taller than the caps. The caps themselves are based on classic Roman type proportions. The counters are perfect circles, while the surrounding arcs are elliptical. The vertices on the lighter weight caps, like the ‘M’, descend just below the baseline.

The sum is a typeface that is gently propulsive. Since Futura’s introduction decades ago, it has been in constant use by designers, proving to be as timeless as Renner had hoped. Available in several different styles for the web, Futura PT comes in two distinct weights for desktop syncing—Book and Heavy—as well as their oblique variants.


Adonis.

Also available from ParaType for the desktop is an original face, Adonis. Designed by Natalia Vasilyeva, Adonis is an all-purpose serif with a noble yet affable feel. From the ParaType website: “Adonis is a typeface of classical appearance with slightly oblong proportions, small rounded serifs, and soft letterforms. The face is both space-saving and quite legible in small sizes. The family consists of four standard font styles and proposed for text and display typography.” Adonis includes two weights, plus italics.

Add Futura PT and Adonis to your favorites so you can access them easily when desktop syncing becomes available, and use them on the web today. If you’ve never given Typekit a try, sign up (it’s free!) and upgrade to a paid plan whenever you’re ready.

This is our fourth post in a series highlighting foundry partners who will offer fonts for desktop sync, including Dalton Maag, FontFont, and Mark Simonson Studio.

tt

Launched in 2006, TypeTogether is the creation of José Scaglione and Veronika Burian, who studied together in the Typeface Design program at the University of Reading. Among the foundry’s leading operational principles is the idea of working together on designs, (“hence the name,” they say) and TypeTogether functions as a collaboration space for several other type designers in addition to the two founders.

As a guiding theme for their designs, TypeTogether focuses especially on the professional editorial market and its need for typefaces that allow for extended reading while still exhibiting a high degree of personality.

Abril and Tablet Gothic type samples
Tablet Gothic shown as a heading, with body text set in Abril Text. (Source text.)

TypeTogether designed Tablet Gothic with titling in mind—in particular, for publications that have both an online and physical presence. This is a typeface that translates beautifully from screen to print, and now that it’s available for desktop sync, it’ll be even simpler to use in designs intended for multiple media types. With 42 different styles to play with, this is a titling font that easily maintains consistency without ever appearing repetitive.

As a recommended pairing with Tablet Gothic, Abril Text is an attractive typeface well-suited for publications, with the four main text weights all manually hinted to ensure a smooth progression between digital and printed works. Subtle curls in the descenders give the typeface an extra boost of charisma without being distracting.

Bree type sample
Bree.

With even more character, Bree is a delightful typeface that was modelled after the TypeTogether logotype and takes a lot of inspiration from handwriting. Its long-form uses are more limited than those of Abril, but it performs beautifully as a headline or subhead font, and would also do nicely for pull quotes. Even with its strong personality, Bree is easy to pair with other fonts.

This powerful flexibility is the real beauty of TypeTogether fonts: they’re built to work hard, and they make it look effortless. Below is a complete list of the families from TypeTogether that we’ll be making available for desktop sync. Add them to your favorites so you can find them quickly when we launch the desktop sync feature, and use them on the web today. If you’ve never given Typekit a try, sign up (it’s free!), and upgrade to a paid plan when you’re ready.

This is our third post in a series highlighting foundry partners who will offer fonts for desktop sync, including Dalton Maag and FontFont.

mss-coquette

Mark Simonson started designing type after the original Mac launched, and some of his biggest hits – like Proxima Nova, Coquette, and Refrigerator Deluxe – came of age during the dawn of web standards. Ten years ago, on any given day, web designers would gather to discuss the latest browser support for CSS and the latest typefaces from Mark Simonson — and today, we still do.

Mark is, one might say, a real web designer’s type designer. He worked with Paravel on the recent redesign of his site, and he maintains a blog (his Notebook): for starters, read The Scourge of Arial, Not a Font, or Mad Men, Mad Props (the latter being one of Mark’s popular “Typecasting” posts, which challenge the historical integrity of type in popular culture). Read interviews with Mark at Typedia, MyFonts, and Everyday Type.

We’re incredibly happy, and grateful, that Mark Simonson Studio was one of Typekit’s first foundry partners, and thrilled that Mark is now also one of the first type designers offering fonts for desktop sync.

proxima-nova-ss01
Proxima Nova Regular in Adobe InDesign, with alternate “Primer” characters (a, l, y) enabled via OpenType Stylistic Set 1 (source text)

Proxima Nova, a geometric sans serif typeface, routinely appears in Sites We Like, and it’s one of your favorite fonts. Available in over 42 styles including Condensed and Extra Condensed, this expansion of Mark Simonson’s 1994 Proxima Sans could hardly be more versatile (or more popular).

Many of the features we have made available as separate web “families” – like alternate characters and small caps / old style figures – will be available as proper OpenType features in the desktop synced Proxima Nova families.

coquette-fillet
Coquette with ligatures disabled (left) and enabled (right)

Coquette is a flirtatious script that evolved over the course of eight years as Mark revised his early attempts at the design to match the warmth of his sketches. Coquette was originally called Ruby Script after Mark’s daughter Ruby, but was renamed to avoid confusion with an up-and-coming scripting language from Japan.

Ligatures are available in both the desktop and web versions of Coquette, although browser support for OpenType features is still imperfect. To try them on the web, enable the All Characters set in the Language Support section of the kit editor.

refrigerator-ss04
Refrigerator Deluxe default characters (above) and Stylistic Set 4 (below)

As further evidence of Mark Simonson’s iterative approach to type design, Refrigerator Deluxe is an extension of his earlier Refrigerator. Whereas the original represents a specific mid-20th century vernacular style, Deluxe expands this to, in Mark’s words, “an anthology of vernacular styles through the extensive use of alternate characters”.

In fact, Refrigerator Deluxe uses all 20 of the stylistic sets available to OpenType fonts — “sets of stylistic variant glyphs corresponding to portions of the character set”, according to the OT spec. See page three of the Refrigerator Deluxe User Guide (PDF) for details about the alternate characters available in each stylistic set. And when you know which one you want, here’s the CSS to make it happen:

h3 {
  -moz-font-feature-settings: "ss04";
  -moz-font-feature-settings: "ss04=1";
  -ms-font-feature-settings: "ss04";
  -o-font-feature-settings: "ss04";
  -webkit-font-feature-settings: "ss04";
  font-feature-settings: "ss04";
  }

Below is a complete list of families from Mark Simonson Studio that will be available for desktop sync. Add them to your favorites so you can find them easily when we launch Typekit’s desktop sync feature next month, and use them on the web today. If you’ve never given Typekit a try, sign up (it’s free!) and upgrade to a paid plan whenever you’re ready.

This is our second post in a series highlighting foundry partners who will offer fonts for desktop sync, including Dalton Maag and Mark Simonson Studio.

FontFont_mast

Earlier this month, we dropped some big news: Typekit is bringing fonts to the desktop. In the coming weeks leading up to launch, we will be featuring each foundry who has partnered with us for this initial release, highlighting some of the fonts that will be available.

Last week we featured Dalton Maag, a new Typekit partner for web as well as for desktop. Today we’re looking at one of Typekit’s very first foundry partners: FontFont.

FontFont was founded in 1990 by Erik Spiekermann and Neville Brody with the intent to provide a wide aesthetic range of expertly designed and technologically advanced digital typefaces to graphic designers all over the world. From the innovative FF Beowolf and FF Justlefthand to the now-classic serif typeface FF Scala, FontFont presented its variety early on and has continued down that path since.

Type specimen created in Adobe Illustrator
Type specimen in Adobe Illustrator, using desktop-synced FF Tisa

FF Tisa, by designer Mitja Miklavčič, is a recent but important addition to the FontFont library. It was designed for use in digital media, its physical characteristics (high x-height, pronounced slab serifs, open forms) allowing it to render well at small sizes while its soft shapes provide a friendlier alternative to more formal serifs.

FF Tisa first arrived at Typekit in 2009, and has since become a staple of many a web designer’s toolbox. The four basic styles are available for the web—and when you need to switch gears from web design to graphics and print, they will also be available for desktop sync along with the more recently-released FF Tisa Sans, which makes for a great pairing.

Making use of Adobe Kuler
FF Dagny type specimen in Illustrator, making use of the integrated Adobe Kuler palette

Another design to come out of FontFont in the last few years and quickly gain notoriety is FF Dagny. Designed originally by Örjan Nordling and later adapted into a complete font family by Göran Söderström, when FF Dagny was first released and licensed for the web, lamenters of the web-safe Arial soon recognized it as a superior alternative: a no-nonsense grotesque sans serif that reads better in body text while holding its own at larger sizes.

The entire FF Dagny family is available at Typekit for the web, and the basic four styles – regular, bold, and their italics – will be available for desktop sync.

Synced fonts will often include OpenType features, such as Tabular Figures.
Synced fonts will often include OpenType features, such as Tabular Figures

From two Typekit standbys to a new addition: FF Good Headline Condensed, designed by Łukasz Dziedzic. FF Good is an American Gothic with machine-driven quirkiness, and is best suited for use at display sizes. Typekit is now offering three weights plus italics for web use, and all six styles will be available for desktop sync.

Below is a complete list of families from FontFont that will be available for desktop sync. Add these fonts to your favorites so you can find them easily when we launch Typekit’s desktop sync feature next month, and use them on the web today. If you’ve never given Typekit a try, sign up (it’s free!) and upgrade to a paid plan whenever you’re ready.

This is our first post in a series highlighting foundry partners who will offer fonts for desktop sync, including FontFont and Mark Simonson Studio.

dalton-maag

Help us welcome Dalton Maag to Typekit. Renowned for the technical quality of their typefaces, the foundry is best known for corporate projects that include custom fonts for Ubuntu (an open source typeface already available on Typekit), Nokia, BMW, and the Rio 2016 Olympic Games. But Dalton Maag has been making typefaces for everyone since 1999. For starters, we have included Aktiv Grotesk, Effra, Foco, InterFace, Lexia, and Tondo Signage in the Typekit library.

lexia
Top to bottom: Lexia Regular, Black, and Regular. (source text)

A quiet, well-balanced slab serif, Lexia is available in six weights (with italics). Like many Dalton Maag faces, its subtlety is its strength: individual letterforms don’t draw much attention, and yet the typeface is full of details like slightly rounded serifs, right angles, and sharp terminals — details that often draw the wrong kind of attention when they’re overdone or inconsistent.

tondo-signage
Tondo Signage Regular.

Tondo Signage is a single style of the small Tondo family, made specifically for display use (and drawn by Veronika Burian of TypeTogether fame). Unlike the rounded versions of some fonts, Tondo’s roundness is innate, and feels so; and, unlike many “friendly” display faces, it is impeccably balanced.

aktiv-grotesk
Aktiv Grotesk Bold. For body text, James Todd’s Garvis Pro seems pleasantly compatible (though your mileage may vary).

Designed as an alternative to Helvetica – Bruno Maag’s attempt to strike a balance between Helvetica and Univers – Aktiv Grotesk works in much the same way that these classic rationalist sans serif faces do: it is best used for headings and short copy at mid-to-large sizes. Aktiv Grotesk is available in seven weights ranging from Hairline to Black, with italics.

Add these Dalton Maag fonts to your favorites so you can find them easily when we launch Typekit’s desktop sync feature next month, and use them on the web today with a Typekit Portfolio plan or higher. If you’ve never given Typekit a try, sign up (it’s free!) and upgrade to a paid plan whenever you’re ready.

We’ve added many new fonts to the Typekit library — muscular and stylish seriffed faces, energetic sans serifs, and improved variations of TypeTogether’s Bree.

rooney-sans
Top to bottom: Rooney Sans Regular, Black, Bold Italic (source text)

Jan Fromm’s Rooney Sans is the new, unseriffed sibling of his popular Rooney. Nimble, well-balanced, and available in twelve styles (from Light to Black, with italics), Rooney Sans is a rounded face that doesn’t feel goofy or incomplete. It sets especially well as large body text and midsize headings.

freight-big-display
Freight Big Pro Light Italic, Freight Display Pro Bold

Two more members of the Freight family are now on Typekit — Freight Display and Freight Big, designed specifically for use at large sizes and served with PostScript-based outlines for smooth Windows rendering. Acute, stylish, and able to complement an array of text faces.

krete
Top to bottom: Krete Regular, Black, Book Italic

Equal parts clunky and precise, Krete is a muscular and extremely handy seriffed face. The bluntly cut forms of its Regular provide an even texture in body text, with lowercase characters weighted to encourage the horizontal motion of reading. Available in six weights, with italics.

iskra
Iskra Bold and Medium Italic

TypeTogether’s chewy, tangy Iskra is a cosmopolitan, brush-inspired sans. Its italics wobble and flow like underwater plants, and its uprights can barely contain their exuberance. Iskra is a fun face with a forgiving rhythm that can accommodate lengthy headings and subheads.

bree
Bree Bold in IE8 on Windows 7, with GDI ClearType rendering

Even more from TypeTogether: six styles of Bree (Light, Regular, and Bold, with obliques) have been manually TrueType hinted for crisp rendering at small sizes on Windows. These hinted Bree variations are excellent for wayfinding text like navigation, sidebar headings, and pull quotes. If you’re already using Bree, just republish your kits to receive the latest files.

We hope you enjoy using these new typefaces. If you’ve never given Typekit a try, sign up (it’s free!) and upgrade to a paid plan whenever you’re ready.

We’ve added several new fonts to the Typekit library, including painterly wood type and a contemporary blackletter face.

cosmopolitan

Cosmopolitan from Wood Type Revival was first cut by Morgans & Wilcox Manufacturing Co. in the 1890s. Now, more than 120 years later, it flourishes beautifully on the web — try shading it with CSS text-shadows.

eskapade

Eskapade and Eskapade Fraktur from TypeTogether are a lovable serif and blackletter pair. Tall and sharp, these are fantastic for display use — and they make for smart, compact headings.

We hope you enjoy using these new typefaces. If you’ve never given Typekit a try, sign up (it’s free!) and upgrade to a paid plan whenever you’re ready.

James Todd Design

Please join us in welcoming James Todd – and his typeface Garvis – to Typekit. Garvis is a mid-contrast text serif with a lively rhythm and good texture, and it works well across platforms thanks to manual TrueType hinting from James himself. Be sure to let James know that his hard work is appreciated.

text
Garvis Pro Book, with Italic heading (source text)

Garvis is available in four styles (Book, Italic, Semibold, and Bold). Upgrade to a Portfolio plan or higher to use it. If you’ve never tried Typekit, sign up (it’s free!) and upgrade when you’re ready.